/  Mule Deer
  • In this episode of the Hunt The High Country Podcast, we sit down with Braxton

  • I just released a new mule deer film called Connected. This was filmed during the

  • Our new Mule Deer video: Connected, will be released later this month. This film will

  • Hunting High Country Mule Deer: Step 2 - "Identifying Patterns" - This is part 2

  • Big Game Hunting TO THE MAX - Do you want a longer hunting season, or

  • This is part 1 of a 3 article series on how to find big mule deer bucks

  • Preseason Scouting for Mule Deer -- Is it worth it? Pre-season scouting seems to be

  • I cut my teeth hunting Wyoming mule deer and elk as a teenager -- hunting

  • “Get your rifle and shoot that buck,” was all I heard as I scrambled to

  • Mule Deer Winter Kill States: What should we expect? Many of us who live, or hunt

  • By Caid Evans Colorado. In terms of big game management, Colorado has it figured out. I

  • Hopefully you've had a chance to watch the first video of our Idaho Invasion deer

  • If you've followed Altitude Outdoors for very long, especially on social media you may be

  • After losing his father in the spring of the year, Kyle Paxman scores big on

  • We're excited to announce our new YouTube channel that will allow us to produce and

  • By  Keith Kline The morning of Oct. 9th 2016 found me and my hunting partner, Jake,

  • The 7 Year Wait - Big Utah Mule Deer - by Austin Cowan The morning of

  • "Precious Resources" not only shows video of some giant public land mule deer bucks, but

  • My 2015 Wyoming mule deer season started similar to many prior years. A significant portion

  • The Big Decision

    At 46 years old and having been bow hunting since age 16 in my home state of Washington, I always have loved the high country and chasing animals up there with my bow. I have always read the stories and looked at the pictures of the lucky hunters who pursued the big early season bucks in the Colorado high country as I'm sure many of you have. I always chose the early deer and elk season in my home state during that time of year and let Colorado be a dream.
  • "How big is that buck?" I asked as I squinted my eyes and leaned forward

  • Clay Allen's footage once again finds us staring at some GIANT mule deer. These incredible

  • In Part 1 I discussed various biological and environmental perspectives relative to High Desert Mule deer.

  •   PART I – BIOLOGICAL/ENVIRONMENT PERSPECTIVES I honestly believe that most Mountain Hunters consider taking a Boone

  • I felt a sense of relief as I peeked over the edge of the rim rock cliff and saw the lone buck was still lying comfortably in his bed. The buck was perched on a long, narrow bench at 12,000’ where he was very contently overlooking the large alpine basin below him. His velvet covered antlers protruded well above the stunted willows as he laid there next to a lone rock on this cold and wet September day. Thankfully, the rain and snow mix that had been falling all morning, had kept the buck bedded during our entire 3 hour stalk.

  • Each year my family and I plan at least one out of state hunt. We

  • It was a beautiful morning, September, 15th 1952.  The temperature was 39 degrees at 6:00 am. My grandpa, Albert D. Bazzanella was getting things ready to head to the south country on a typical deer hunt.  The "South Country" where my grandfather was planning to hunt, is about a 2 hour drive from his home town of Rock Springs, Wyoming.  He would drive to Baggs Wyoming where he would then head south for about another hour.  This country, at that time, was prime deer country!  Back then, anyone above 11 years of age, could purchase any of the big game animal tag and hunt them anywhere in the state of Wyoming.  This area was my grandpa’s favorite area.  I remember as a very young boy going hunting in this same area with my grandpa and my dad, years later, and passing up 26 and 28 inch bucks because it was too early in the day for them to kill anything...grandpa would say, "The day will be ruined!"  Anyway, back on track...my grandpa was putting his Winchester model 94, 30-30 lever action rifle into the Jeep and realized that he didn't have any shells for it.  By this time, it's around 7:00 am.  Mike's Sporting Goods was the only sporting goods store in Rock Springs and it didn't open until 8:00 am.  That didn't bother grandpa, because he knew that he would have no problem harvesting a buck deer anytime throughout the day.

  • Wildlife management is one of the more complicated concepts to wrap my head around. I am constantly searching through various sources of information in hopes of better understanding the intricacies so I can feel like more of an educated user of this incredible resource. My desire is to also learn how to contribute more helpful in-field information to local Wyoming Game and Fish personnel when they seek public comment.

  • Going into the 2013 mule deer hunting season, I had set some personal goals for myself. These goals were important to me and I made it imperative that these goals be met. At the top of the list were two goals: My number one goal was to pay tribute to my late grandmother Lena Bernal and my late grandfather Don Eastman. My idea of honoring them was by killing a big high country mule deer. And by doing this, I would reach my number two goal. My number 2 goal was to redeem myself from the previous season.

  • The “Buck Haven” during the summer scouting trip What doesn’t kill you will make you want to do it again right? Going into the application period for Nevada in 2005, I envisioned a semi-comfortable horseback hunt deep in the pristine wilderness with one of my good buddies. That vision was snuffed out as the drawing results arrived and he didn’t draw and I did. So much for the ponies I had planned on carrying me and all my stuff.

  • It was nearly 12:00 am as we had just finished topping off the coolers and loading the remainder of our gear. I gave my wife and kid’s a hug goodbye and my brother and I headed for the truck.  As my house became a distant blur in the rear view mirror, we were officially on our way to that long sought after place we like to call hunting camp. Wide awake, full of energy and with only a couple hour drive between us and the great mountains we love to roam, we could not wait to see what this journey had in store for us. After waiting what seemed like a lifetime, my brother had finally regained his Wyoming residency and we were pumped and ready to go.

  • Its late august and the hot Texas sun has once again pushed me westward to the Colorado high country in search of my most respected quarry...a mature rocky mountain mule deer. High country archery mule deer hunting has got to have the largest learning curve of any of the deer species. I have personally never hunted such a wary animal. They truly are perfectly suited to their environment making them the most perfect prey animal and offering a very challenging hunt.  In four years I have managed to harvest just one buck in 2007 with a muzzleloader on opening day that scored about 185. Although a good buck, I was disappointed that I hadn’t been able to take him with my bow. This made my archery quest burn that much deeper. I was now fully committed to Archery Mule Deer; none of this lowland stuff.....IT WAS HIGH OR DIE. The next few years brought many more lessons and a lack of success, but were a blast none the less.

  • “There He is, you ready to shoot?” Travis asked. “Yes,” I responded as I leveled off the crosshairs of my .300 Weatherby Mag just under the top of the big bucks’ shoulder. The rifle cracked and he jumped hard, bounding fast into the trees in front of him. “ You missed! Why did you rush the shot?!” Travis responded to the failed shot. “I didn’t, I was leveled off and steady on the top of his shoulder.” I responded.

  • David, Wendi, Dalton, and Carson Pond 2013 Oregon A familiar story to new and old hunters alike, those long evenings at the kitchen table before the application deadlines planning the next seasons hunts. The question for most people , do I have enough points to hunt where I want to, and who do I want to partner up with. For me that's easy, my family are my favorite hunting partners and we've paid our dues at the kitchen table.

  • Sleep wasn't going to come easy knowing the buck of a lifetime wasn't coming home with me. The buck I placed all my bets and scouting efforts that season was taken by a friend. All of my hunting plans changed for the rest of the month, what would I do with the rest of my deer season?

  • Sometimes the pursuit of one animal can and does consume a hunter. The animal becomes ingrained in the imagination, even creating sleepless throughout the season. Moments in time, wondering where the animal is and most importantly, where he will be found on opening day. The year 2012 would introduce me to not just one of these animals but two. Two mule deer bucks that would be everything I was looking for in a buck. I won't make any apologies for it, when it comes to deer I am a trophy hunter. My standard for pulling the trigger is a big bodied, mature animal. I look for mass in the antlers, a white face, and in most cases a big frame.

  • Although it has been three years since this hunt has taken place, I remember it as if it were just yesterday. I am sitting here now, admiring the beautiful mount of this gorgeous buck and reflecting back to the awesome journey that I was so fortunate to be a part of that rainy October day. A hunt filled with numerous ups and downs and twists and turns, yet by some last minute miracle turned out to be one of my greatest adventures to date, an unbelievable adventure that undoubtedly won't soon be forgotten.

  • Early on in my hunting career, more often than not, the larger bucks always seemed to get away. However, with that being said, over the course of the past three decades I have learned a lot about this amazing animal while chasing them around in high country and I can proudly say, more often than not, I end up getting the buck I am after. This reversal took lots of research, many years of trial and error and fine–tuning of hunting methods.

  • Early on in my hunting career, more often than not, the larger bucks always seemed to get away. However, with that being said, over the course of the past three decades I have learned a lot about this amazing animal while chasing them around in high country and I can proudly say, more often than not, I end up getting the buck I am after. This reversal took lots of research, many years of trial and error and fine–tuning of hunting methods.

  • Generally when archery seasons begin out West, most mule deer will still be in the velvet stage of antler development.  When a bowhunter is lucky enough to take a trophy in velvet, oftentimes they want to preserve their trophy in its natural state.  For those who are backpacked deep into a remote wilderness, they are generally not able to get it frozen and or deliver it to a taxidermist in a timely manner.  As a result, the velvet slips and they no longer have the ability to mount it with the original velvet intact.  Knowing how to successfully preserve the velvet is crucial for back-country hunters who wish to prevent the velvet spoiling and “slipping”.  Untreated velvet, in room temperatures, begins to breakdown immediately and should be treated within 24 hours (depending on weather).  Here's what I've done over the years that's worked for me while either in the field or at trailhead.

  • With over 16,000 archery tags issued in the state of Utah for mule deer each year, the odds of harvesting the largest buck in state were less than .000062 %; not exactly numbers worth betting on in Vegas. Then combine that with the odds of taking a muley with a bow that would go in Utah’s all-time top ten and the odds get even worse, at .00002%. Any way you do the math, you’d have to be one lucky guy to fill that tag. On August 19, 2007, because of the help of some great friends, I beat the odds and punched that winning lottery ticket with a buck we had named Superman.

  • On August 14th, 2012 I received a phone call that no person ever wants to get.  I learned that one of my very good friends, Darrell Bozarth had passed away at his home in Indiana. I hung up the phone and sat there with tears running down my face, in shock that a dear friend and hunting buddy was suddenly gone.

  • On August 14th, 2012 I received a phone call that no person ever wants to get.  I learned that one of my very good friends, Darrell Bozarth had passed away at his home in Indiana. I hung up the phone and sat there with tears running down my face, in shock that a dear friend and hunting buddy was suddenly gone.

  • It’s no secret that the first decade of our new millennium, the period of 2000-2009 produced an incredible number of Boone & Crockett mule deer entries.  Living in Colorado for nearly 25 years I have personally seen big buck numbers go from almost non-existent in the early 90’s to what was generally observed as a healthy abundance in the 2000’s.  Colorado has always led the B&C records with total entries for mule deer. That fact is very common knowledge for serious mule deer hunters but for a few years in the mid part of the last decade, the number of entries to come from the state surprised even this group.  Boone & Crockett entries for mule deer during the last decade peaked in 2004 and that was mainly due to the huge numbers of bucks to come from Colorado.  Tag numbers increased and the winter of 2007/2008 had a serious impact on some of the state’s best mule deer herds and the outlook is now much different.

  • As a career firefighter/paramedic for over 21 years I have had the distinct opportunity to learn lessons from others unfortunate circumstances.  It was during the first couple of years of my career as a firefighter, I went through paramedic school as part of my apprenticeship training.  Towards the end of the classroom portion of this grueling 9 months of paramedic school, we started the clinical phase of our EMS education.  This involved doing “ride-a-longs” with other fire departments and private ambulance companies.  What I soon found out is that I learned a great deal from these seasoned paramedics. The poise and ability of some of these street medics made a lasting impression on me but there were also some lessons learned of “what not to.”  I was educated as much from the impressive skills of some amazing medics as from the occasional mis-step.  It wasn’t so much the mistake that sticks with you, but your ability to learn and adapt and become better because of it.

  • I couldn’t believe my eyes as I looked through my binoculars at the monster muley that was feeding on the opposite side of the basin. I couldn’t have scripted the opening morning glassing session any better had I tried. My hunting partner, Scott Mansor, and I both judged the huge buck’s typical frame right at the 190 B&C mark and with his long cheaters extending out from his G2’s on both sides, we figured his outside spread was pushing 35 inches wide. He also had a couple of other really small points and he was in full velvet. The buck was about two miles away on the opposite side of the extremely large basin we had been glassing and would require a very lengthy stalk.

  • I felt a sense of relief as I peeked over the edge of the rim rock cliff and saw the lone buck was still lying comfortably in his bed. The buck was perched on a long, narrow bench at 12,000’ where he was very contently overlooking the large alpine basin below him. His velvet covered antlers protruded well above the stunted willows as he laid there next to a lone rock on this cold and wet September day. Thankfully, the rain and snow mix that had been falling all morning, had kept the buck bedded during our entire 3 hour stalk.

  • It was just a few moments away from darkness and I had been stalking a high country mulie for almost two hours.   I couldn’t let this opportunity get away.  I knew I had to act quickly or my chance would be gone forever.   I was so lost in the moment that I didn’t even take the time to absorb how beautiful this old buck was.   I knew he was a four point.  I knew he had great brow tines.  I knew he was in velvet.  But what I didn’t know, was the caliber of deer I was standing 40 yards from.

  • This was no ordinary deer I was looking at through my spotting scope - he was huge! Normally, a buck that was missing his G3 tine on one side wouldn’t even get me excited, but the fact that this buck had that classic boxy rack, great mass and a 33” outside spread, more than made up for the missing G3.

  • It all started on Sept. 15, 2009 when my friend A.J. Angelovic and I were stalking a nice buck we had spotted in a deep alpine basin.  In route we were spotted by 4 or 5 bucks that were bedded at around 250 yards away.  We stopped and glassed each and every one of them and I remember taking a little longer looking at a young 3X4 that had a pretty good mass.  I remember saying he would be a pretty good buck in a few years, but it seemed like we said that about almost every buck we looked at.

  • The 2010 archery seasons started out like many others. Anticipation was running on high and my senses told me that it was going to be another great year! While putting final touches to my packing list and stuffing it all into my external frame pack I once again realized how nervous I get before going into the backcountry. I reminisce about the year prior and try to think about what I had learned and use that knowledge to improve the next year. With each passing year I learn more and better ways to hunt the backcountry.

  • Day was Friday; the date was the 28th of September, 2009 as I finished the final touches of packing my external frame packwith all the necessary gear and supplemental foods for the next 2 weeks of hunting in the high country. Anticipation was running on high as I stuffed everything I could into my pack. Just minutes after that I was trudging my way through the timber headed higher into the backcountry in search of a gagger buck.

  • I couldn’t help but reflect back on my successful archery hunt from a month earlier as I made my way through the predawn darkness. I still had to headlamp for another hour and a half before sunup, so I had plenty of time to keep playing the events of the hunt through my mind. Even though over a month had passed, I still couldn’t believe I was fortunate enough to have taken the archery buck of a lifetime with my bow. The buck gross scored 200 5/8 and was extremely massive.

  • The tall and massive buck fed in the avalanche chute at 600 yards. I wanted to close the distance, but in order to do so I would have to drop off the rugged ridge and circle around the huge basin and come in from below. After carefully slipping up through the bottom of the basin, I reached a spot where I could easily take him at 400 yards. It was opening day and I wanted to make it a little more fun, so I passed on the 400 yard shot and continued my stalk on the massive buck. I worked my way through the thick scrub pines and reached my desired location. Once I got to the little knob that would give me a 175 yard shot, all hell broke loose as gun shots broke the silence in the cold mountain air. My heart was broken!

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